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  • Vol 97 (2016)

    Dewrell Heath, «How Tamar's Veil Became Joseph's Coat» Vol.97 (2016) 161-174

    The phrase 'ysp(h) tntk' appears in two biblical narratives: the Joseph story (Genesis 37) and the Tamar and Amnon story (2 Samuel 13). While the phrase is usually translated 'coat of many colours' or 'long-sleeved garment', this examination argues that the original significance of the term is to be found in its context in 2 Samuel 13, where it is said to be a garment worn by virgin princesses, an argument supported by comparative material from the Middle Assyrian Laws. The garment's appearance in the Joseph narrative is likely secondary, ultimately deriving from the Tamar and Amnon story.

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    Aster Shawn Zelig, «Israelite Embassies to Assyria in the First Half of the Eighth Century» Vol.97 (2016) 175-198

    This article shows that the kingdom of Israel sent ambassadors on an annual basis to the Assyrian empire during much of the reign of Jeroboam II, and it explores the implications of these contacts for the interpretation of Isaiah 1–39 and Hosea. These diplomatic contacts are based on points Fales has raised regarding nimrud Wine List 4 (ND 6212), whose importance for biblical studies has hitherto not been recognized. The recipients of the wine rations in this list are to be identified as ambassadors of weaker kingdoms, among them Samaria, who visited Assyria to pay tribute.

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    Miller Geoffrey D., «Canonicity and Gender Roles: Tobit and Judith as Test Cases» Vol.97 (2016) 199-221

    Clues from rabbinic literature suggest that several factors were at play in establishing the early Jewish canon, including the dating, theology, and language of disputed texts. Another vital yet overlooked criterion is adherence to patriarchy, and a careful analysis of the Books of Judith and Tobit illustrates how these texts failed to meet rabbinic standards for gender roles. Most notably, the countercultural figures of Judith and Anna would have scandalized the rabbis by their encroachment on traditionally male spheres of activity, their freedom of movement inside and outside the home, and their ability to chastise male characters without repercussions.

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    Damm Alex, «Ancient Rhetoric as a Guide to Literary Dependence: The Widow’s Mite» Vol.97 (2016) 222-243

    This essay applies conventions of ancient rhetoric to the analysis of the literary sequence of Mark and Luke’s Gospels. With an eye on basic and more advanced rhetorical handbooks, I outline two significant rhetorical conventions for improving upon literary sources: clarity (perspecuitas) and propriety (aptum). When we ask whether the evangelist Mark has applied these principles to the adaptation of Luke's Gospel (following the Griesbach Hypothesis), or whether Luke has applied these principles to the adaptation of Mark (following the Two-Document and Farrer Hypotheses) in the pericope of the Widow's Mite, we find that the latter scenario is more plausible.

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    Prosinger Franz, «Vorschlag einer dynamisch-konzentrischen Struktur des Johannesprologs» Vol.97 (2016) 244-263

    There are strengths and weaknesses in earlier studies that propose for the Prologue of John's Gospel either a concentric (M.-E. boismard) or a spiral structure (I. de la Potterie). The modified versions of these proposals, recently advanced by M. Coloe and B.T. Viviano, are not convincing. This article seeks to demonstrate that evidence of the Prologue's concentric and dynamic structure is to be found in the introduction of a new subject ('we') in John 1,14c, which marks the beginning of a new section in the structure of the Prologue's argumentation. the 'we' of vs. 14c stands in relation to the 'children of God' of vs. 12. Consequently, vs. 14ab is to be viewed (pace M.-E. Boismard) as the crucial turning point at the center of the structure of the Prologue.

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    Callan Terrance, «Partenoi in Corinth: 1 Cor 7,25-40» Vol.97 (2016) 264-286

    Interpreters differ significantly regarding the identity of the 'partenoi' discussed in 1 Cor 7,25-40. There is some uncertainty about whether they are men and women, or only women. And those who understand them as only women differ as to whether they are betrothed women, unmarried daughters, spouses in spiritual marriages, or young widows who are possible candidates for levirate marriage. I argue that the 'partenoi' are only women, and that they are unmarried daughters of Corinthian Christians. The argument is based mainly on usage of 'partenos' in literature written before, and at approximately the same time as, 1 Corinthians. In addition i offer an interpretation of 1 Cor 7,25-40, especially of vv. 36-38, that supports understanding the word as designating young, unmarried daughters.

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    Gilbert Maurice, «Note philologique et exégétique sur DanielLXX-Th 3,40 (17)» Vol.97 (2016) 287-293

    In DnLXX-Th 3,40 (17), the formula that the french liturgy translates by trouve grâce devant toi ('as to please You') and that Jerome translates by ut placeat tibi is an enigma. The Greek versions offer a problematic text. As it has long been recognized, they presuppose a Hebrew Vorlage which is difficult to construe as an optative form. Instead, it should be construed as a determination or clarification of the principal clause (Joüon-Muraoka § 123r).

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