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  • Vol 93 (2012)

    Kalimi Isaac, «King Solomon: His Birth and Names in the Second Temple Period Literature» Vol.93 (2012) 481-499

    In Chronicles Solomon is represented as one who was born under normal circumstances. He appears in the center of David’s nineteen descendants, and as the youngest of Bathsheba’s four sons, but still gained the kingship. The name «Solomon» was given to the child by God prior to his birth and He elected him as king. The root of the name was interpreted twice, but there is no mention of «Yedidyah». The allusions to or ignorance of the name «Yedidyah» in Psalms, Nehemiah, Chronicles, and Josephus, as well as the question if «Qoheleth» is Solomon’s third name, are also discussed.

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    Pinker Aron, «On the Meaning of Job 4,18» Vol.93 (2012) 500-519

    This paper argues that the terms wydb( and wyk)lm in Job 4,18 should be understood as referring to the set motions of the sun, moon, and stars as well as to sporadic meteorological events, respectively. Such understanding does not dilute the validity and force of the qal wahomer in 4,18-19. The comparison is between the inanimate but permanent (sun, moon, stars, meteorological phenomena) and the animate but impermanent (humans). The difficult hlht is assumed to have been originally hhflft;@ from hhl, «languish, faint». Taking hlht as having the meaning «weakness» provides a sense that eminently fits a natural event.

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    Schütte Wolfgang, «Die Amosschrift als juda-exilische israelitische Komposition» Vol.93 (2012) 520-542

    The oracles of Amos written in the 8th century BCE were brought from the Kingdom of Israel to Judah after the fall of Samaria in 720 BCE. We think that the Israelites in «exile» in Judah were hoping for a restoration at that time. The Book of Amos can be interpreted in this context: it explains the feelings of Israelite refugees in Judah (Amos 1-2), the responsibility of the Israelite elite for the disaster (Amos 3-6), the reason why the people bear the consequences of the catastrophe (Amos 7), and why there is hope for the refugees in Judah, but not for the exiles in Assyria (Amos 8-9).

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    Thiessen Matthew, «Abolishers of the Law in Early Judaism and Matthew 5,17-20» Vol.93 (2012) 543-556

    Three times within Matt 5,17-20 passage Matthew uses the verb (kata)lu/w, signaling its importance. Consequently, I will focus on two historical events around which these words cluster: the Antiochan persecution and the destruction of the Temple. Since Jewish literature characterizes the Hellenizers of the Maccabean period as law abolishers, labeling a group as such implicated it in endangering the nation. As Josephus’ Jewish War demonstrates, after the Jewish Revolt, law abolishers were blamed for the Temple’s destruction. Thus, Matthew addresses the charge that Jesus abolished the law and, in so doing, brought about the destruction of the Temple.

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    Ferda Tucker S., ««Sealed» with the Holy Spirit (Eph 1,13-14) and Circumcision» Vol.93 (2012) 557-579

    Most studies of Eph 1’s «sealed with the promised Holy Spirit» have tried to articulate the Christian ritual or experience that the sealing metaphor describes, such as baptism, confirmation, charismatic gifts, etc. This article, however, refocuses on the theological logic of vv. 13-14 to argue that, regardless of the Christian rite described, the author here explicates that rite by referring to circumcision with the use of the verb «sealed». The argument includes the insight that the description of «sealed» in Eph 1,13-14 corresponds to other texts that describe circumcision as a final step in Jewish proselytism.

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    Noonan Benjamin J., «Hide or Hue? Defining Hebrew #x$ At%A» Vol.93 (2012) 580-589

    The word #$xAtA% has long puzzled Hebrew lexicographers. The present paper evaluates the most common definitions for this elusive Hebrew word, focusing particularly on Stephanie Dalley’s recent consideration of this term. Dalley’s proposal that #$xAtA%A% is derived from Akkadian dušû and means «faience beadwork» falls short linguistically as well as contextually. More plausibly, Hebrew #$xAtA% originates with Egyptian ths, a term used with reference to leather. This well suits the contexts in which #$xAtA% occurs and reflects Egyptian influence on the tabernacle and its terminology.

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    Kilgallen John, «Was Jesus Right to Eat with Sinners and Tax Collectors?» Vol.93 (2012) 590-600

    All Jewish religious teachers wanted sinners to repent; how one achieves this was disputed, as was Jesus’ choosing to associate with sinners in their houses and at their meals. Four times Luke describes Jesus as fraternizing with sinners, which violated Jewish pious practice. The first three times (chaps. 5, 7 and 15) Jesus underlines his motive for this conduct and its value; the fourth time (chap. 19), and rather late in the Gospel, Luke shows that indeed Jesus’ method proved true, i.e. the wisdom of his conduct was shown justified by repentant children of God.

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    Swetnam James, «The Meaning of toi/j a)kou/sasin at Hebrews 4,2» Vol.93 (2012) 601-608

    The words toi/j a)kou/sasin in Heb 4,2 are frequently taken as referring either to the Israelites of the desert generation who, in contrast to the majority, did believe in God’s care, or to the Christians who, in contrast to the desert generation, do believe. After indicating why each interpretation is unsatisfactory, the note argues from the wording of the entire verse in the context of the epistle as a whole that the words refer to the Christians who heard the words of the Lord as he instituted the Eucharist. He is the one who, through the linkage of faith, makes entrance into God’s rest possible.

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